Herbs – Week #4

Caraway

Caraway is a hardy biennial herb that will enjoy full sun in the fall.  The stems will reach between 18″-30″ that will provide a white flower and produce a seed used to flavor candy, cookies, cakes and breads.  The thick like roots can also be eaten.

Caraway flowers in the summer and does not transplant well so sow the seeds in a place you want it to grow.  You can either harvest the seeds for replanting or let them fall in place to reseed on their own.

Caraway likes a loamy soil which would consist of equal amounts of compost, clay and sand.

Caraway seeds ground up and use in your lentil dishes.  It is also good in any cabbage dish.

Caraway seedheads will be brown and tan when dried to use in craft projects, such as wreaths and garlands.

Caraway seeds can be chewed as a breath freshner.

Lord bless you and keep you.

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Garden Wednesday

Here are photos this week of vegetables currently growing in our garden.

Slicing Cucumber

Slicing Cucumber

Peaches and Cream Corn (2)

Dinosaur Kale

Dinosaur Kale

Kale & Tomato

Kale & Tomato

Jicama

Jicama

Globe Artichoke

Globe Artichoke

Slicing Cucumber and Hot peppers

Slicing Cucumber and Hot peppers

Crane Melons

Crane Melons

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe

Bush Beans & Bush Pickling Cucumber

Bush Beans & Bush Pickling Cucumber

Bell Pepper plant

Bell Pepper plant

Bell Pepper plant

Bell Pepper plant

Bell Peppers

Bell Peppers

Armenian Cucumbers

Armenian Cucumbers

Vegetables in the garden currently.

Vegetables in the garden currently.

May the Lord bless you and keep you.

Recipe Tuesday – Borage

Borage

Looking for another way to use those Borage flowers, then try using them in a Moist Method potpourri.

1 cup partly dried marigold petals
1 cup partly dried bergamot flowers
1 cup partly dried marjoram flowers, stripped from the stalk
1 cup partly dried lemongrass leaves, finely chopped
1 cup partly dried lemon verbena leaves
1 cup partly dried borage flowers
3 cups fine salt
1 tablespoon anise seeds
1 tablespoon fennel seeds
1 tablespoon ground coriander
1 tablespoon dried orris root powder
5-6 drops essential oil

Making a potpourri using the moist method, partially dry the leaves and petals and layer them with salt in a covered container.  Leave them for two weeks.  Break up the block that has formed, add spices, orris root powder and a essential oil.  Stir well, then cover and let sit for six weeks, stirring every day.  In a wide-necked container mix the developing potpourri with your fingers.

Lord bless you and keep you.

Herbs – Week #3

Borage

Borage is a herb that bees and wasp love, so make sure it is not planted close to a walkway.  The flowers are a pretty blue star pattern.  Sometimes the flowers may be pink or white.  Allow enough room because the plant can take up as much room as a squash plant.  It will also self-seed annually.

Borage is not picky about the kind of soil.  I have seen it grow in our compost, in a brick border that has clay only or in one of our raised beds, but perfect soil would be light soil.

The flowers and leaves can be used for cosmetic, culinary & medicinal purposes.

Borage likes full sun in the fall and let dry out in between waterings.

Borage flowers can be sprinkled on top of a salad as a garnish.

Borage has been known as a symbol of courage.

Borage flowers can be used in potpourri.  Can be used in skin lotions for cosmetic purposes.  Use the leaves & flowers in soups, garnish or fruit punches.  Leaves can be invused for feverish colds.

Next Monday’s post will be about Caraway.

Lord bless you and keep you.

Vegetable Thursday

Broccoli Waltham 29

Today I am going to journal about Waltham 29 Broccoli.

The seed packet give me the following information:
1) seed depth 1/4″
2) seed space 2″
3) sprouts in 7-10 days
4) plant space 18″-24″
5) matures in 65 days

I love broccoli!  I will be planting our broccoli in bed #1 this fall.  Bed #1 is a bed that faces north/south and is 4’x8′.  So this means I can plant two rows of broccoli on each side of the bed for a quantity of 4 plants on each side.  This gives me a total of 8 plants.  The germination is 7-10 days, so I will stagger the planting dates one week a part.

I start my seeds using 5 parts peat moss to 1 part perlite to ensure it is a sterile soil.

Here in Phoenix, AZ our first frost average date is December 11th each year.  So I need to plan to harvest prior to this date or have a plan in place to protect the broccoli from a hard freeze.

According to Urban Farms planting calendar here, I can begin planting seeds August 15th.  So my first seeds I will start August 15th and then every 7 days start another Waltham 29 Broccoli.  The broccoli starts will go into the garden beginning October 7th.

Recipe Tuesday – Anise

Anise

Now that we have our Anise growing, it is time to figure out what to do with it.

Here is a video I found on YouTube talking about how Anise is good to lower Cholesterol.  I don’t know anything about the medicinal values of herbs yet, but I like to share information with others.  So feel free to comment in the comment section about what you have discovered about Anise.  Video is here.

If you are interested in making a Anise tea for a cough simmer one teaspoon crushed anise seed and 1 tablespoon powdered licorice root in 3 cups water.  Let steep for 20 minutes.  Then pour over two teaspoons thyme leaves.  Cover and let steep another 10 minutes.  Then strain through a cheesecloth.  Drink one cup that is hot three or four times day.

What are some ways you have used Anise?

Lord bless you and keep you.